Chairs:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Description

Qualitative methodologies and epistemologies to analyze crime, deviance, and social control, have a longstanding tradition in Criminology. With such studies becoming part of a canon of research conducted by means of (a triangulation of) interviews, ethnography and document analysis. Such studies have brought forward invaluable research and advanced knowledge about the deviant’s perspectives and ascribed meanings, and how such meaning-giving processes relate to deviance and crime. Moreover, the functioning of social control apparatus and social reaction have as well been explored using qualitative methods.

Qualitative methodologies and epistemologies, while allowing complex, relational and in-depth analysis of several topics of research, pose specific challenges to researchers collecting and analyzing data. Gaining and maintaining access to subjects, inquiring socially deprived and vulnerable groups, inquiring organizations and elite or powerful groups, use of innovative methods (involving visual and linguistic data and approaches, critical mapping, action research, community based participatory research methods, classic and new ethnographies, such as netnographies, liquid ethnographies and instant ethnographies, etc.), ethical considerations on the subjects’ and the researchers’ well-being, are some of those challenges. Moreover, the issues of quality control, reflexivity in qualitative research, action-research, social utility and its potential use to critically inform policies, demand that researchers in Criminology come together, exchange, and cooperate to develop and advance qualitative methodologies and epistemologies for robust criminological inquiry.

Aims of the group

  • To provide members and researchers with the opportunity to exchange and cooperate in improving qualitative methodologies and epistemologies in the study of crime, deviance, policing, and the broader social control.
  • To create possibilities for discovering, discussing and overcoming common challenges and difficulties in researching using qualitative methods.
  • To facilitate new avenues for qualitative research in Criminology.
  • To increase interdisciplinary thinking.
  • To sustain close networking and cooperation on research and education projects.
  • To reflect about the place of qualitative methods in the Big Data Society

Activities

  • Stimulating on-going constructive debate among members for the wider ESC community to benefit from (via online fora, by means of regular meetings, panels and social events during the annual ESC meetings);
  • Interaction and critical debates with European researchers with an interest in qualitative methodologies and epistemologies;
  • Exploring sub-topics in qualitative research in Criminology, namely (but not limited to) online criminological research (e.g. analyzing blogs thematically, Skype-interviewing, “netnography”), qualitative research with elites and powerful subjects, use of visual methods, action-participation research, quality and reflexivity in qualitative research, mixed-methods, auto-ethnography, and digital tools on qualitative research;
  • Initiating debates on epistemologies and their connection with qualitative methodologies.
  • Fostering pre-arranged/thematic sessions and meetings of the WG at annual conferences of the European Society of Criminology;
  • Exchanging information among members (especially through social media and regular newsletters) on scientific events, publications, and funding opportunities relating to qualitative methodologies and epistemologies;
  • Contributing to the existing literature on qualitative research in Criminology by promoting pre-peer review among members, and informing publishers of the WG activities and publishable work of members, as well as through the use of social media.

 

Chairs

Julie Tieberghien: Department of Penal Law and Criminology,Ghent University (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Olga Petintseva:  Department of Penal Law and Criminology, Ghent University (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Rita Faria:  School of Criminology – Faculty of Law of the University of Porto (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Yarin Eski: Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies – Liverpool John Moores University (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

Membership

All members of the European Society of Criminology interested in the WG-QRME aims and activities are welcome to join. Any personal and professional details will go to Rita Faria via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.