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The ESC Working Group on Balkan Criminology is an initiative of the Max Planck Partner Group for Balkan Criminology (MPPG; www.balkan-criminology.eu), which has been jointly established in January 2013 by the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law and the Zagreb Faculty of Law. It represents a working forum of the MPPG's "Balkan Criminology Network" (BCNet) - a network of researchers and scholars with particular interest and expertise in the field of crime research and criminology in the Balkans that has been active since June 2013.

Aim

The Working Group aims to create a forum of experts in the field of criminology and criminal justice focused on the Balkans in the framework of the ESC. This will be the basis for regional research endeavors, exchange of experience and knowledge, gathering of regional expertise, and should in the long run also ensure a pool of prospective junior researchers to be hired across the region.

Research Focuses

The idea of doing criminological research focused on the Balkans is very much related to the history of the region, as well as with the consequences of wide spread ethnic conflict and ongoing state-building, whereby the criminal justice system plays a major role. Also, European criminological research, especially quantitative surveys, have so far usually covered only some parts of the region (EU member/candidate states), creating an 'empirical black hole' in the very center of the Balkans, and making a regional approach far overdue.

Therefore, a regional approach is not only historically and sociologically plausible, but it also takes into account the transnational nature of organized crime and illegal markets - the main security challenge in the Balkans (UNODC, 2008). Since conventional and violent crime seems to play a far less important role in the region than compared to the rest of Europe (UNODC, 2008), it again seems justified to look at the region as a whole in search of the causes for such findings. Whether and how this relatively high level of security is reflected in the feelings and perceptions of (in)security and crime in the Balkans is another challenging research question. In addition the region can be explored in terms of new methodological trends in violence research due to the presence of large-scale mass-violence, and the empirical potential this holds for criminological research. A last issue concerning not only the Balkans, but also international criminal justice at a global level deals with international sentencing: How should perpetrators of the most heinous crimes be dealt with, what is the purpose of their sentencing, which principles should govern the sentencing, and shouldn't there be a minimal range of sentences for the 'worst of the worst'?

Members

Members are researchers and scholars from the region and outside of it, out of whom the following are regular ESC members:

  1. Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Albrecht, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany
  2. Prof. Dr. Jan Van Dijk, INTERVICT, Tilburg University, Netherlands
  3. Prof. Dr. Marcelo Aebi, ICDP, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
  4. Prof. Dr. John Winterdyk, Mount Royal University, Canada
  5. Prof. Dr. Gordana BuÅžarovska, Faculty of Law, University Justinianus Primus, Skopje, Macedonia
  6. Prof. Dr. Effi Lambropoulou, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens, Greece
  7. Prof. Dr. Djordje Ignjatovic, Faculty of Law, University of Belgrade, Serbia
  8. Dr. Michael Kichling, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany
  9. Assoc. Prof. Muhamed Budimlic, Faculty of Criminal Justice, Criminology and Security Studies, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  10. Assist. Prof. Dr. Anna-Maria Getoš Kalac, Faculty of Law, University of Zagreb, head of the MPGG
  11. Assist. Prof. Dr. Almir Maljevic, Faculty of Criminal Justice, Criminology and Security Studies, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  12. Assist. Prof. Dr. Tuba Topçuoclu, Faculty of Law, University of Istanbul, Turkey
  13. Assist. Prof. Dr. Andra-Roxana Trandafir, Faculty of Law, University of Bucharest, Romania
  14. Reana Bezic, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany
  15. Aleksandar Maršavelski, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany
  16. Karlo Ressler, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany
  17. Suncana Roksandic Vidlicka, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany
  18. Filip Vojta, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany

Website

For further information, please see the website of the MPGG: www.balkan-criminology.eu

Course:

'Balkan Criminology' One-Week Intensive Course
Max Planck Partner Group for 'Balkan Criminology'
October, 5 - 9, 2015
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: http://balkan-criminology.eu/dubrovnik-2015

Contact

Assist. Prof. Dr. Anna-Maria Getoš Kalac: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Assist. Prof. Dr. Almir Maljevic : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Assist. Prof. Dr. Andra-Roxana Trandafir : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.